Your cart
Close Alternative Icon

News

A Guide to Roof Flashing Repair and Installation

A Guide to Roof Flashing Repair and Installation

Whether you're hiring a roof specialist or doing it yourself, here's what you need to know about roof flashing installation.

When it comes to maintaining your roof, one of the most important elements to remember is the flashing. Flashing plays a huge part in keeping your house safe and secure from water leaks, mould contamination, building rot, and even structural collapse. You may think that such a minor part of your roof is insignificant, but ignoring your flashing’s scheduled repair or maintenance can have dire consequences.

If you don’t remember the last time you had your roof flashing looked at, it may be time to look into scheduling a check-up with your trusted roofing contractor. Of course, it would be better if you also have the know-how on how flashing works and how it’s maintained. To help you get started, we’ve prepared a guide to roof flashing repair and installation in NSW.

What is roof flashing?

What is roof flashing?

Roof flashing is a thin material that roofers use to direct the flow of water away from critical areas of your house or building roof. Usually made from galvanised steel, it is often placed wherever the plane of a roof meets a vertical surface like a dormer or a wall. You install flashing to surround special areas on your roof like skylights, chimneys, and vents.

Common Types of Roof Flashing

Common Types of Roof Flashing

There are heaps of roof flashing types available, and the one you should choose depends on the function you require it for. To give you an idea of what type of flashing you should have for your house or building, here are some of the most common types of flashing available in Australia:

  • Valley Flashing

This type of flashing is made from a sheet of metal, and it is usually pre-painted to match the colour of the roof’s shingles. The valley flashing is often used and fastened on open valleys.

  • Skylight Flashing

You need to make sure that water can’t get in around your skylights. Installing flashings around the skylight area will solve that problem. Sometimes, skylights will already have complementary flashing, but there are times when repairs or maintenance are necessary. When that happens, it’s better to reach out to your roofing contractor so that you can select the right type of flashing based on your need.

  • Kickout Flashing

This type of flashing directs water into the gutter, away from the wall. It sits between the gutter and the step flashing.

  • Drip Edges

Drip edges are flashings made from thin metal placed at the edge of the roof. This type of flashing is used to have the water drip off the roof while preventing damage in a home or causing a leak.

Nowadays, there are pre-made flashing pieces you can purchase. However, most roofing professionals cut their own roof flashing from sheet metal in order to tailor-fit the flashing to their clients’ home.

If you are planning to install flashing yourself, you should be careful with your selection. Make sure that you get a pre-made flashing that’s built specifically for roofs. That way, you will be able to avoid breakage due to incompatibility.

Repairing Your Roof’s Flashing

Repairing Your Roof’s Flashing

There are several ways to repair roof flashing, depending on the issue you are addressing and the materials you are repairing. If you’re planning to repair your roof’s flashing yourself, here are some things you should know:

  • Small corroded spots or small holes in the flashing

If you see any corroded spots or small holes in your roof’s flashing, you should repair them as soon as possible. Thankfully, for holes up to 2cms across, this issue is easy to solve. All you have to do is plug pinholes with roofing cement and fix the holes with a patch that’s made from the similar material as your flashing.

  • Extreme flashing corrosion

If your roof’s flashing is badly-corroded, a simple repair may not be enough. You might need to completely replace your corroded flashing with a new one. To do that, remove a few shingle rows and old flashings and add the new one. You should bring back the shingles you moved once you’re done.

  • Loose drip edging

If you think your current drip edging has become loose, you should reseal it right away. Resealing is quite easy. Just make sure that you seal the flashing beneath the single and refrain from sealing the drip edge along the eaves.

When repairing roof flashing, make sure to use high-quality materials and ensure you do a good and thorough repair job. Otherwise, the hard work and money you’ve put into repairing your flashing will be wasted.

Tips in Maintaining Your Flashing

Tips in Maintaining Your Flashing

Know more about flashing maintenance by reviewing the top tips indicated below:

  • Locate leaks

When doing flashing maintenance, one of the first things you should do is locate any possible leaks. You would usually have an idea of this already if you encounter water leak issues with your chimney, skylights, or other parts of your home.

  • Lock down your flashing as tight as you can

Over time, your flashing may become loose. That usually happens when the screws anchoring it become loose or when the metal around the edges of the hole wears away. To solve this issue, simply buy the same screws as your flashing and screw them back tightly. Cover the screws with roofing cement immediately after.

  • Re-caulk the flashing of your chimney

Your flashing is usually attached to your chimney’s mortar. Over time, that mortar can be damaged or destroyed. In order for it to remain effective, it will need to be replaced carefully.

Get top-quality flashing and roofing materials from Sydney Roof & Building Supplies

We always recommend you get the highest-quality materials possible for your home repairs. After all, your home should be your greatest investment. If you have roofs that need repair, do not hesitate to check our catalogue of items. We have heaps of available flashing materials for you, all with their own set of features.

Get high-quality roofing supplies from only here at SRBS. Call us on 02-8090-3483 or email us at mark@srbs.com.au or at marie@srbs.com.au to know more.

Continue reading

Types of Roof Flashing

Types of Roof Flashing

Roof flashing is critical in making sure water does not enter your roof.

Sydney homes receive a battering from the extreme weather conditions it experiences all year round. Heat waves, hail storms, heavy rainfalls, and  string wind, can all take a toll on your home, particularly the roof. Over time, these weather events may affect the structural integrity of your home’s roof system, resulting in damaged roofs and leaks.

This is why routine maintenance is important in reinforcing your roof and making its individual parts effective against any weather. One of the most overlooked yet, extremely crucial part of the roof is the unassuming, simple roof flashing.

What is Roof Flashing?

Roof flashing is a small elements of a roofing system. But, it does a significant waterproofing job. Flashing is designed primarily to prevent water from getting into the house through the gaps on the roof. It is estimated that 90 per cent of roof leaks are due to faulty flashing.

Different types of roof flashing protect different areas of the roof. But whatever type they may be, their main function is to redirect water away to prevent leak and damage. Roof flashing is applied to the corners and valleys of the roof, as well as to any object that projects outward from the roof.

Roof flashing comes in a variety of materials, such as:

  • Aluminium — a commonly-used flashing material. It is lightweight, durable, cheap and easy to apply. It is typically coated to protect it against corrosion.
  • Lead — soft and pliable, lead is one of the oldest flashing materials used for roofing. It is durable and often used for chimneys due to its reliable protection against water seepage. However, lead comes with health risks and is no longer used as often.
  • Copper/Lead Coated Copper — pliable, low-maintenance, solders well, and compatible with almost any wood preservatives, copper flashing is the most durable flashing material. It easily adapts to weather changes and lasts a long time, too.
  • Steel/Galvanised Steel — rust-resistant, easy to apply, and cheap, galvanised steel roof flashing is visually-appealing and can be painted on to meld with the rest of the roofing. It is not as durable a material, however, as others on this list. Thus, it is not recommended in regions with harsh weather conditions.
  • Plastics, Rubbers, and other Composite Materials — these are also cheap but may not be ideal for areas that experience extreme heat or cold. These can be made from recycled materials.

Certain building codes may require roofing professional to comply with specific standards for flashing. For example, flashing materials used must be manufactured in accordance with AS/NZS 2904. Check your local building codes to make sure your roofing system is compliant with the applicable regulations.

Different Types of Roof Flashing

How many types of roof flashing are there? Well, there is one type for every part of the roof — which is a lot! There’s even a flashing for flashing.  All the different types work together. Know more about the key types of roof flashing below:

Continuous/Apron Flashing

This flashing works like an apron between the roof slope and a vertical wall or roof penetration. It consists of a long piece of metal with expansion joints. Its purpose is to redirect water away and carry it down to the shingles.

Step Flashing

This consists of a rectangular metal bent at 90˚ in the centre for a roof-to-wall application. Protecting the transition spots between the roof and wall, this flashing is laid in “steps” — that is, in layers overlapping 2 inches. It redirects water into the gutter. If one layer fails to do its job, the one beneath it will carry on the task.

Base Flashing

Base flashing works with another flashing type, the counter flashing, to effectively seal the vertical and horizontal intersection of the roof. It is typically used for chimneys and walls or parapets. This flashing keeps water from penetrating the roof deck.

Counter Flashing

This flashing complements the base flashing and is entrenched into the masonry to prevent water from getting behind the base flashing. It is also known as cover flashing or cap flashing.

Drip Edging

Applied on a roof’s eaves, this flashing guards against the water seeping underneath the shingles in case of an overfilled gutter. Without it, water can get into your home and damage the roof deck, wood fascia board, drywall, and other roof parts.

Vent Pipe Flashing

This is a special flashing that has a cylindrical body with a flange at the bottom which is fitted over pipes. It prevents water from slipping around the pipes or flues.

Valley Flashing

Shaped like a V or W, valley flashing is placed atop the roofing felt where one of the most critical water leaks can happen — the roof valleys. The roof valley is where two segments of the roof meet forming a dip or a valley. This flashing type guides water down the roof and straight into the gutter.

Saddle Flashing

Also referred to as joist saddle flashing, this is placed over joists, beams, or other protrusions through the cladding.

Common Applications of Roof Flashing

Roof flashing is found all over the roof. These are the crucial areas where flashing is required:

  • Roof valleys and joints — there are prone to water penetration due to the angles that can easily collect water.
  • Roof protrusions — these are anything that juts out of the roof such as plumbing pipes, satellite poles, and dormers. Pipe boots fitted around the pipe can help keep water from slipping in.
  • Chimneys — flashing around chimneys prevents water from collecting and leaking at the base of the chimney.
  • Skylight — there are skylight installations that come with built-in flashing. Without it, roofing professionals purchase or create flashing for skylights, as this area can be notorious for leaks. Flashing for skylights typically consists of continuous flashing, step flashing, and finally, saddle flashing.
  • Roof edges — flashing around these areas help secure the roof against leaks by directing the water off the roof.
  • Kickouts — roofing professionals apply kickout or diverter flashing to reroute rainwater that falls at the lowest point of the joint between the roof and wall and into the gutter.
  • Roof ridge — flashing is applied to cover the roofing material. It secures the roof apex from water penetration due to rainwater falling at an angle.

When to Call for Professional Roof Flashing Service

Roof flashing is essential for weatherproofing every part of your roof that is vulnerable to leaks. Flashing also provides aesthetic appeal and creates a sharp, seamless finish on the roofing job. It is essential to pay attention to roof flashing during routine maintenance.

Over time, flashing can get damaged and may need replacement. If left unfixed, there may be serious water leak damage that can be quite costly to repair. When you notice signs of damage like holes, corrosion, dried out sealant, or flashing that has bent or come loose, it’s time for a roofing service.

When it comes to roof flashing, you can trust the high-quality products and services from Sydney Roof and Building Supplies. We carry different ranges of flashing for your roof. Contact us so we can discuss how we can help with all your roofing needs.

Continue reading